10 Answers from Today’s Living With Brain Tumors Event

Lessons Learned

I just participated in a great Twitter Chat that was moderated by Dana-Farber and the National Brain Tumor Society. For those of you who don’t do Twitter, I thought I would re-cap the conversation here. The info is all archived on Twitter under the hashtag #DFCIchat. Dr. Reardon was there representing @DanaFarber, and several staff members from @NBTStweets were also online. All the answers noted below are from Dana Farber, unless otherwise noted.

Q1: What are the most common kinds of brain tumors?
A1: Glioblastomas are the most common adult primary cancer of the brain; about 13,000 cases are diagnosed every year in the US.
A1: Other kinds of brain tumors include oligodendrogliomas, astrocytomas, and meningiomas.
A1: Metastatic cancer to the brain or central nervous cancers is 4-5 times more common than primary cancers.

Q2: What are some of symptoms of brain tumors?
A2: Symptoms can include difficulties with balance, strength, coordination, vision & ability to speak. Seizures are also common.
A2: Headaches that are new/worsening. Often worse when lying down & in the morning – they may include nausea or vomiting.

Q3: What are strategies for coping with cognitive brain tumor problems?
A3: Neurocognitive testing is critical and allows identification of areas of strength and weakness.
A3: Potential interventions include medications such as stimulants (ritalin and nuvigil) and memory boosters (aricept)
A3: There are also many great apps to help, such as Lumosity, or formal cognitive rehab therapy
@CBlotner: Other interventions include support groups or programs such as @campdream where survivors can meet peers like them.

Q4: What kind of support is important when someone is living with a brain tumor?
A4: Brain cancer can have such a wide array of impacts on patients and families: physical, cognitive, and emotional.
A4: Patients often have physical difficulties and may need help with strength, balance, and coordination.
A4: Patients may experience changes in personality and behavior, so support and education is also important for caregivers.
@askdebra: There is an incredible #braintumor socmedia community hashtag: #btsm. 1st Sun of month 10-11pm ET is #btsm twitter chat

Q5: What role does nutrition play in managing brain tumors?
A5: Good nutrition is critical for the immune system and overall health.
A5: A healthy, balanced diet can help patients get through treatment with fewer side effects.
A5: A trained nutritionist should be a key member of your care team as a brain tumor patient.

Q6: What role does social media play for the brain tumor community?
A6: Social media can bring together clinicians, patients, and advocates who are passionate about curing brain tumors.
A6: A brain tumor diagnosis is difficult to cope with. Connecting w/ other patients through social media can be invaluable.
A6: Great info is available online, but some is misleading or wrong. Be cautious and discuss any questions with your care team.
@amandahaddock: In a community defined as “small”, social media connects those effected and helps them feel less isolated.
@BrainTumourOrg: We have a Facebook group for anyone affected. People use it to share their stories, news, tips. It’s a real community.
@Cangela25: @Livestrong does free programs for Cancer Survivors at YMCAs
@amandahaddock: Facebook groups to check out: Glioblastoma Cancer/Brain Trauma Caregivers; Brain Tumor Talk, Brain Cancer Family

Q7: What role does exercise play in managing brain tumors?
A7: There is some evidence that exercise may improve symptoms and possibly impact progression and survival.
A7: Exercise can combat fatigue, improve bone health, and reduce anxiety.
A7: Exercise keeps the immune system strong and can reduce risk of complications.

Q8: How do clinical trials contribute to brain tumor advances?
A8: Clinical trials are essential to improve brain tumor treatment and include a wide variety of therapeutic approaches.
A8: At Dana-Farber we test patients’ tumor samples to recommend specific clinical trials that offer the most promise and hope.
A8: Clinical trials are essential to improve brain tumor treatment and include a wide variety of therapeutic approaches.
A8: We are developing a variety of strategies to stimulate the immune system to recognize & attack tumors.
@NBTStweets: You can search for brain tumor Clinical Trials at clinicaltrials.gov
@TheLizArmy: I would love to see a SURVIVORSHIP PLAN for brain tumor patients/survivors. These are developed for other cancers.

Q9: How can caregivers of patients with brain tumors find support?
A9: A brain tumor diagnosis can cause huge emotional & financial disruptions for families. Support for caregivers is critical.
A9: Finding support groups (online or in person) can be key to coping for caregivers.
@AmandaHaddock: There are people all over social media to connect with. Active users on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, and Pinterest
@TheLizArmy: Caregiver.com (@todayscaregiver) has a ton of amazing resources and articles; Caregiver.com also features articles w/”famous” caregivers which is pretty inspiring

Q10: What resources would you like to share?
A10: On September 20th we’ll be hosting an annual Living with Brain Tumors event at Dana-Farber: bit.ly/N2A9o6
A10: At Dana-Farber we offer a number of clinical trials for brain tumor patients: bit.ly/UzudHo
@AmandaHaddock: facebook.com/OperationABC will post about any event nationwide that is raising awareness or funds for brain cancer research
@AmandaHaddock: @dragonmasterfdn keeps a list of any organization that has direct patient/caregiver benefits. dragonmasterfoundation.org/resources/
@BrainTumourOrg: For everyone from the UK – support groups regularly all over the country #DFCIchat: bit.ly/1rTEbBY
@NBTStweets: Download Frankly Speaking About Cancer: Brain Tumors for information on living with brain tumors #DFCIchat
@TheLizArmy: The #BTSM community hosts tweet chat every 1st Sunday for anyone impacted by brain tumors pic.twitter.com/P7f2SJ5AOV
@AmandaHaddock: NBTS has an advocacy day every May in DC. Awesome opportunity to meet survivors and let your voice be heard at the Capitol.

I didn’t try to re-create the whole conversation for you, but you can get a pretty good idea of how it went. Overall, it seemed very successful. I hope that there are a lot of people that can benefit from this information.

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