I Had A Dream…

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Last night I had a dream about an adorable little boy. It was not a child I knew, but I fell instantly in love with him. His mother was unable to care for him, and ultimately he came to live with Richard and I.

He was precious, and we were happy to have him with us. And then suddenly, he couldn’t walk. They told us he had DIPG. And I knew that this little boy we loved would be taken from us far too soon.

They say your dreams are your subconscious trying to work out a problem in real life. To me, this dream meant that even though we really did lose a child to brain cancer, we still feel the emotions of each new diagnosis. Those children are our children. We still fight with that kind of passion, but the key is helping people understand they need to join the fight BEFORE it really is their child.

You’ve seen those commercials, the sick child in the hospital over the holidays. You are thankful for your healthy kids and so you donate. I used to do that, too. And we would contribute to Make-A-Wish and other charities that helped those kids and families. They are good at what they do. But doing what we have been doing for years is not getting us the cures we need.

We want to take the research community and give it a turbo boost. Parents, think about the days when you were in high school. To complete a paper for school, you had to go to a library, look things up on little paper cards, go find a book (that you prayed would be shelved properly), and dig through that book hoping to find the info you needed.

Today’s kids do a quick search on the internet for exactly what they are looking for, and they have their source in moments.

Cancer researchers are stuck in the “library”. They only have access to the info at their local branch, and sometimes the filing system isn’t great. If they have a new idea, the information they want might not be there at all.

We want to change that. We want to build an internet “library” for researchers that will have every piece of information they are looking for. It will be categorized properly, quickly accessible, and updated daily.

We’ve got the foundation. It is housed at the Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia and it currently has genomic and clinical data for pediatric brain cancer patients and their families. Records are being collected from four hospitals right now, but we want more! We truly want this to be a collaborative tool that will help a multitude of researchers at multiple hospitals.

But a resource like this costs a lot of money, and traditional funding sources are inadequate. That’s why we need you. There is nothing that Americans can’t do once they set their mind to it. The ice bucket challenge proves that millions can be raised very quickly, given the proper incentive.

We love our individual donors, and they are a loyal bunch. However, we need to multiply our donors if we are going to truly make a difference. That’s why the #whippingchildhoodcancer challenge is so cool. It isn’t a huge monetary commitment, but it allows you a forum to talk about why you are giving. It can inspire others to do the same. And before you know it, hundreds, or even thousands, of people know about the database and why it is important.

So if you haven’t done it yet, please consider taking a pie to the face for childhood cancer awareness. And make sure you let me know if you do it for Dragon Master Foundation so we can post the video!

P.S.
I know that not all of you are on social media (ahem, Danny!) so here’s a brief recap of the #whippingchildhoodcancer challenge:

Our aim is to raise awareness around the 46 children diagnosed and 7 lost every day to pediatric cancer in the U.S. You have 46 hours to complete the following challenge. You must record a video of yourself taking a pie to the face (can be a paper plate with either whipped cream or shaving cream). Once completing the challenge you must choose a pediatric cancer charity to donate $7 to and tag/challenge 7 friends (46 if you’re feeling bold!) to make their own pie in the face video. If you’re unable to complete the challenge within 46 hours, you must donate $46 and tag/challenge 7 friends.
Be sure to explain the 46/7 statistic in your video. 46 kids diagnosed every day, and 7 die from pediatric cancer.

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