Recognition for “Putting Kids First”

Dragon Master Foundation, Uncategorized

Gabriella Miller Kids First Pediatric Kids First Research Program

We are so proud to share the announcement that the Center for Data Driven Discovery in Biomedicine (D3b) has been selected to lead the NIH’s Kids First Data Resource Center. D3b is based at Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia, and they along with a number of other partners, including Dragon Master Foundation, will be a integral part of the new, collaborative effort funded by the National Institutes of Health Common Fund to discover the causes of pediatric cancer and structural birth defects through the use of big data.  The Center will be known as the “Kids First Pediatric Data Resource Center” (DRC).

This effort goes hand-in-hand with the work we have been doing on Cavatica, and as a liaison to the Children’s Brain Tumor Tissue Consortium’s Scientific Advisory Committee, I will be attending meetings for the next three days related to this and other collaborative efforts to take place in the coming year. We are so excited about the influx of resources from NIH, but  it does not take any of the pressure off of the work we are already funding. This means that the project will grow bigger and faster, but there is much work to be done on our own efforts. For example, the clinical trial that we have committed to fund still needs to be funded.

We want to take this opportunity to recognize all of the hospitals, foundations, individual doctors and researchers, and families who have worked together to get us this far. This really is a massive undertaking that we believe will forever change the way we conduct medical research. Please take a moment to read the full press release here.

 

Finding the Poetry

52 People To Meet Posts, Lessons Learned, People We've Helped

IMG_7611A long time ago, I wrote a poem for my coworkers. I really had a lot of admiration for them, and they taught me a lot of life lessons. They worked hard, played hard, and made the most of every day. They were paralyzed veterans, and as much as I could, I tried to learn from the lessons they shared. Their strength amazed me, and they made me re-think one of my favorite pastimes – complaining. 😉

I think in a lot of ways, I met those men and women to prepare me for what life had in store. It isn’t always easy. It most certainly isn’t fair. But what you choose to do with the pieces you have left after your life explodes… well, that can make all the difference.

Today was supposed to be an “office” day for me. A day to tackle the mountains of paperwork I’m behind on. Instead, it turned into a day to go out into the world and see what it had to share. A lot of what I do is try to raise money for cancer research, and today I had the opportunity to get a check from one of our loyal supporters. That’s a really good thing!! But the reason they are supporters is because their daughter, Addison, died from brain cancer. That really sucks. I get to know them a little better each time we meet, and our conversations nearly always include laughter along with the tears. Today the check came with a hug, and I’m not sure if it felt better to be able to hug them as a thank you or to be hugged in return. Hugging is like that, I guess.

I also had a chance to go visit their daughter’s grave. They picked an amazing spot for her, and I could just feel the love there. Still… it just sucks to visit a child’s grave. I sat and talked with her for a minute about what her parents are doing so that other kids might not have to suffer the way she did. Addison was a fighter that defied the odds. I think she would be happy to know that her tumor got taken out, and hopefully what we learn from it will be used to fight some other child’s tumor.

As I visited with Addison, I listened to her wind chimes and the other sounds of nature there. I thought about how the world shows us poetry if we just stop to see it. Sometimes it is given to us in words, but many more times it is just the feeling you have inside. There aren’t always words to express the feelings we have. The love and the grief are just too big for words.

Addison’s parents let us us her as the “sponsor” for the first child to go on the upcoming clinical trial we are sponsoring, and because of their generous matching gift, we actually funded the first two kids onto the trial. That left me with coming up with a second sponsor person – someone that we can visualize as we fund the third spot on the trial for this unknown child.

And that’s when the day took a turn. You see, there are just so many families we know that have been touched by this disease. So I tried to narrow it down based on significant days to that family, and even that didn’t help! There was the anniversary of Ethan’s passing yesterday, Carter’s birthday today, and the anniversary of Jake’s passing today/tomorrow. (Yes, Jake is special and gets two days. More about that later. )

Most of these kids I never got to meet except through the broken-hearted words of their moms and dads. It’s the same for the adults with brain cancer. They leave behind shattered families who ache to have someone say their name. To know that they mattered and continue to matter.

We are funding this clinical trial to try and save lives, and for me, it is so special to connect the spots on the trial to these special brain cancer warriors. I hope it is special for their families, too.

We post about the progress pretty regularly on Facebook, so please join us there to see pictures of our sponsors and help us fund all 200 spots on the clinical trial. There are some really great stories to share with you as we go, and if you would like your loved one to be part of this movement, just let me know.

P.S. As for the rest of my day, I hope I got to spread a little sunshine into Carter’s family’s world, and I know that my brother and daughter spread a little into mine. I may have more to share on that later, too.