So Much For “Catching It Early”

David's Journey, Lessons Learned
David & Rachel

Does this look like a kid waiting on brain surgery?

I found a Facebook post today from before I started this blog. You see, I didn’t know the path that we were headed down. I didn’t know that I would be trying to help others navigate the ugly world of brain cancer. I thought my son had a brain tumor that would require some potentially risky surgery, but that we would get it out and be on our merry way. I didn’t know a lot of things – then.

Fast forward to today, when I know more than I ever wanted to about brain cancer and how devastating it is – even when it is small and they catch it early. You see, this disease isn’t like most cancers. Catching it early doesn’t dramatically improve your chance of survival. It being small doesn’t make it any less aggressive.

Looking back at this post, I am struck by how naive I was. I know that the rest of the world is also that naive. I know that you won’t really understand unless, God forbid, it happens to you or someone you love. And that’s the real kicker. It COULD happen to you or someone you love. We have no idea why David got brain cancer. Most brain cancers can not be traced to a specific cause. He didn’t smoke or drink or even use a cell phone much. He was a healthy, happy 16 year old who didn’t deserve this. No one does.

This post is full of optimism, and though we may not have David with us anymore, we still have his sense of optimism. We know we are on the right track. We know we will help put an end to this disease, and most likely, many others. I wish with all of my heart that it had happened in time to save David, but I move forward everyday with a sense of urgency that it today it could be someone else’s “David”. One day, a mother will get to keep her innocence because of the work you are helping us do.

Here’s the post from September 3, 2010:

David was having really bad headaches so his dad took him to the ER – twice. Second time they did a CT scan and saw something. Turns out he had a small growth with some bleeding. The bleeding was irritating the area & giving him a headache. (We had originally thought the bleeding was an issue, but it seems to have stopped fairly quickly on it’s own.) So the headaches alerted us to a problem (the growth) that might have gone unchecked for a while otherwise.

The growth is a concern because it shouldn’t be there, but as growths go, it seems “good”. It’s small and compact, like a ball – not “reaching out” like an open hand.

Because it is in his head, they want to be very careful how they approach it. Since everything has stabilized so much (a very good thing) they are waiting for the dust to settle (or in this case for the blood that is in the wrong place to be reabsorbed) so they have a nice clear picture when they put their tiny scope camera in.

Now, this may sound intense, but there are some good things working here: 1) they caught it very early and 2) they have time to calmly decide on the best approach to fix it. Since he is doing so well, they can start with the least invasive thing and only use the more invasive stuff as a latter option. (A lot of times the situation is more severe and they have to use the “big guns” right away. And yes, that is just a figure of speech!)

The growth is in his brain, and not in the easiest location to reach, so the doctor is being very cautious about how and where he goes in. It is very likely that David will have to do a little rehab depending on what procedure(s) they have to use.

His headaches have been well under control (sometimes gone) since the day after he came into the hospital, so he’s feeling pretty good. He has been kidding around a lot today and seems pretty comfortable with what’s going on. He does know everything and was able to ask the neurosurgeon questions. (Which, if you know David, you will know that made him happy.)

Please keep praying for him. Things look good for the circumstances, but we have a lot of work to do next week.

Lastly, I’d just like to thank all of you who’ve sent messages of thoughts and prayers. We’ve been fortunate that we’ve never really had to deal with this kind of thing before, so I never really knew how much that meant. We are confident that God is working powerfully for David, and we are so thankful for the prayer warriors out there who are lifting us up. (On a light note, we were visualizing that today as sort of a prayer with a “raise the roof” hand motion. God is good!)

Can Zika Really Cure GBM? Experts Weigh In

Lessons Learned, Uncategorized

3D Image of the Zika Virus from WikiMedia

For most people, trying to navigate the world of new cancer treatments is not easy. The media reports on new discoveries like they are already viable treatments, and patients are often confused as to why they can’t access things they hear about on the news.

We’d like to help brain cancer patients and their families understand these discoveries a little bit better. The first step is really to understand that there is a big difference between what can happen in the lab and what happens in the human body. The lab gives us our first indications that something is worth exploring, but however promising something is in the lab, in the human body that path can lead to many things — from healing to death.

As our first example in what we hope will be an ongoing dialogue, let’s look at the Zika virus news. You’ve probably seen headlines like “Employing Zika Virus to Treat Advanced Brain Cancer” and “Zika Virus Targets and Kills Brain Cancer Stem Cells”. That sounds great, right? Who wouldn’t want to jump on that?

Unfortunately, these are still lab studies, and have a long way to go in proving safe and effective in humans. For some clarification, we reached out to Dr. Cheng-Ying Ho, MD, PhD, at the University of Maryland School of Medicine. Dr. Ho has done some work with both the Zika virus and brain tumors.

Dr. Ho states, “The misconception about Zika originated from the earlier cell culture studies showing Zika preferentially infects neural stem cells. However, the cell culture system is an oversimplified model. It doesn’t have glia or inflammatory cells like human beings.”

She goes on to say, “Mouse models are a lot better, but most of the mice need to have a weakened immune system before they can be infected. Therefore these mice don’t have the immune response against the virus. It is also an artificial system.”

Many times, doctors and researchers are afraid to share preliminary results from studies because the general public may draw the wrong conclusions. Dr. Ho seems to share that concern. She states that her biggest concern about this seemingly promising strategy is the possibility of developing meningoencephalitis. Meningoencephalitis can be fatal and it has occurred in adult Zika patients.

Dr. Ho ended our interactions by saying, “The concept of using Zika virus to treat glioblastoma is very creative but may be difficult to be put into practice due to the possibility of fatal uncontrollable side effects.”

We also talked to Dr. Javad Nazarian of Children’s National Health System because of his work on pediatric brain tumors. He said that the issue is more complicated in children. “A child’s brain is constantly growing and making neuronal connections. It is an active environment and any time we apply drugs that indiscriminately target tumor AND healthy cells, we could potentially do more harm than good. That is why laboratory findings need rigorous testing and multiple validation steps before they have clinical benefits.” He went on to say that this is one reason that discovery and validation of effective treatments takes time.

Obviously, there are labs who are very interested in pursuing Zika as a possible treatment agent. We know that creative measures will be needed to combat GBM and other aggressive brain cancers, so we will continue to hope that one of these creative solutions will turn out to be a viable solution in humans. Will that be Zika? It seems to be too early to say, but for now, patients should not expect this to be a treatment that would be offered soon.

Note: This article is not intended as medical advice and you should always seek the opinion of your physician before starting or stopping any new treatment. Blog post was first published on Medium.com.