Kids Helping Kids – Four Pennies at a Time

Dragon Master Foundation

Y O U R S P O T F O R L U X U R YIf you follow me on social media, then you have probably seen some mention of the Four Pennies project. There is a unique opportunity with the Four Pennies project to involve the population that stands to benefit the most: children. The money and awareness being raised through Four Pennies will help children with pediatric brain cancer, and by extension children with other types of cancer due to the expansion of collaboration among cancer researchers, but this project does more than that. It also provides young people with a unique, immersive opportunity to learn how they can help make a difference in their world, and among their peers.

Often children feel powerless to impact change on the world around them, and with all the negative news they are faced with, it can be overwhelming. The story of Four Pennies and Eric Montgomery is a powerful image of a young man who chose to make a positive change in the world and is inviting the rest of us to follow along.

You may be wondering why the project is called four pennies. There is more detail about that on the website (link at the bottom of the page), but here’s the way I put it when I’m talking to kids:

Eric decided to ask people to donate for pennies for every step he takes along this long trail. He picked four pennies because that’s the amount of every government cancer research dollar that goes to kids’ cancer research. So for every dollar that the government spends on cancer research only four cents goes to pediatric cancers. ( I usually pause here to see if they think that is fair. Spoiler alert: they don’t.)

Now four cents a step may not seem like very much, but the trail goes all the way from Mexico into Canada, so it’s a lot of steps. We are trying to help Eric reach his goal of getting four cents donated for every step that he takes by going out and telling people in our community about this amazing thing that he’s doing.

Eric began hiking the Pacific Crest Trail on Sunday, March 18th, but don’t worry! You haven’t missed much yet! The Trail goes from Mexico to Canada, so it will take quite a while for him to complete it – about 4 months, in fact! Eric estimates that it will take him about 4.6 MILLION steps to traverse the trail in its entirety. All along the way he will be giving us updates via social media, so it is a great chance for kids to see some educational principles in action.

Here are a few learning opportunities for classrooms who are following along:

• Geography/Geology – Eric will go through 6 of 7 eco-regions in the US. It’s a great opportunity for some real-world map reading and projections of how long it will take him to travel certain distances. Sample questions to ask: What kinds of things might slow Eric down on the trail? What kinds of terrain will he go through? Will he encounter the same type of terrain more than once?

• Goal Setting – Trips like this require a lot of planning and personal motivation. Eric has been planning his trip for months, taking into account that he won’t have access to  resources (food, water, shelter) along many parts of the trail. He will also need to motivate himself while on the trail for that many days by himself. Sample questions to ask: What kinds of things do you think Eric would need to pack for his trip? How much weight would those things weigh? Can he carry everything he would need for the entire trek?

• Preservation/History/Government – In order for trails like this to exist, they had to be commissioned and protected. The Pacific Crest Trail passes by National Monuments, through State & National parks, national forests and federal wilderness areas. It was one of the first two national trails, and was designated as such by President Johnson. Sample questions to ask: Why would the government need to be involved in protecting the trail? What circumstances make it ok to allocate space for public use? What could the positive effects of this be? Could there be negative effects?

• Math – So many possibilities for math! Students can calculating steps for a given distance, estimate how many steps Eric will take in a day, calculate the potential amounts of money raised based on various distances, etc.

• Biology – Six different ecosystems means the potential to encounter a number of native plants and a variety of species along the path. Students could research the most probably plants and animals that Eric may encounter. They could also talk about the ways the animals and plants differ based on the environments they live in. Sample question to ask: How would you expect the plants and animals to differ between ecosystems? Why would they be different?

• Engineering – land management, maintenance and restoration, construction, motorized vs nonmotorized trails. Sample question to ask: How can modern engineering protect nature?

• Language arts – reporting on Eric’s journey, imagining what could happen along the way, and reading about others who have taken the journey are all ways to engage more with Eric’s path along the trail.

If you are interested in learning more about the project, you can check out fourpennies.org or just send me a message! I can pass questions along to Eric out on the trail, and I’m happy to set up a Skype session with your classroom to help them learn more. If you want to make a donation, you can do that here.

 

Leave a Reply

Please log in using one of these methods to post your comment:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s