Kids Helping Kids – Four Pennies at a Time

Dragon Master Foundation

Y O U R S P O T F O R L U X U R YIf you follow me on social media, then you have probably seen some mention of the Four Pennies project. There is a unique opportunity with the Four Pennies project to involve the population that stands to benefit the most: children. The money and awareness being raised through Four Pennies will help children with pediatric brain cancer, and by extension children with other types of cancer due to the expansion of collaboration among cancer researchers, but this project does more than that. It also provides young people with a unique, immersive opportunity to learn how they can help make a difference in their world, and among their peers.

Often children feel powerless to impact change on the world around them, and with all the negative news they are faced with, it can be overwhelming. The story of Four Pennies and Eric Montgomery is a powerful image of a young man who chose to make a positive change in the world and is inviting the rest of us to follow along.

You may be wondering why the project is called four pennies. There is more detail about that on the website (link at the bottom of the page), but here’s the way I put it when I’m talking to kids:

Eric decided to ask people to donate for pennies for every step he takes along this long trail. He picked four pennies because that’s the amount of every government cancer research dollar that goes to kids’ cancer research. So for every dollar that the government spends on cancer research only four cents goes to pediatric cancers. ( I usually pause here to see if they think that is fair. Spoiler alert: they don’t.)

Now four cents a step may not seem like very much, but the trail goes all the way from Mexico into Canada, so it’s a lot of steps. We are trying to help Eric reach his goal of getting four cents donated for every step that he takes by going out and telling people in our community about this amazing thing that he’s doing.

Eric began hiking the Pacific Crest Trail on Sunday, March 18th, but don’t worry! You haven’t missed much yet! The Trail goes from Mexico to Canada, so it will take quite a while for him to complete it – about 4 months, in fact! Eric estimates that it will take him about 4.6 MILLION steps to traverse the trail in its entirety. All along the way he will be giving us updates via social media, so it is a great chance for kids to see some educational principles in action.

Here are a few learning opportunities for classrooms who are following along:

• Geography/Geology – Eric will go through 6 of 7 eco-regions in the US. It’s a great opportunity for some real-world map reading and projections of how long it will take him to travel certain distances. Sample questions to ask: What kinds of things might slow Eric down on the trail? What kinds of terrain will he go through? Will he encounter the same type of terrain more than once?

• Goal Setting – Trips like this require a lot of planning and personal motivation. Eric has been planning his trip for months, taking into account that he won’t have access to  resources (food, water, shelter) along many parts of the trail. He will also need to motivate himself while on the trail for that many days by himself. Sample questions to ask: What kinds of things do you think Eric would need to pack for his trip? How much weight would those things weigh? Can he carry everything he would need for the entire trek?

• Preservation/History/Government – In order for trails like this to exist, they had to be commissioned and protected. The Pacific Crest Trail passes by National Monuments, through State & National parks, national forests and federal wilderness areas. It was one of the first two national trails, and was designated as such by President Johnson. Sample questions to ask: Why would the government need to be involved in protecting the trail? What circumstances make it ok to allocate space for public use? What could the positive effects of this be? Could there be negative effects?

• Math – So many possibilities for math! Students can calculating steps for a given distance, estimate how many steps Eric will take in a day, calculate the potential amounts of money raised based on various distances, etc.

• Biology – Six different ecosystems means the potential to encounter a number of native plants and a variety of species along the path. Students could research the most probably plants and animals that Eric may encounter. They could also talk about the ways the animals and plants differ based on the environments they live in. Sample question to ask: How would you expect the plants and animals to differ between ecosystems? Why would they be different?

• Engineering – land management, maintenance and restoration, construction, motorized vs nonmotorized trails. Sample question to ask: How can modern engineering protect nature?

• Language arts – reporting on Eric’s journey, imagining what could happen along the way, and reading about others who have taken the journey are all ways to engage more with Eric’s path along the trail.

If you are interested in learning more about the project, you can check out fourpennies.org or just send me a message! I can pass questions along to Eric out on the trail, and I’m happy to set up a Skype session with your classroom to help them learn more. If you want to make a donation, you can do that here.

 

Commitment vs. Devotion

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UncleJerry&AuntDonnainDoorway

I was a child when my uncle Jerry died. I remember him through that lens… they are all fond memories. He was the jokester in our family, always ready with a harmless prank. And they were harmless, that was part of the appeal. You could trust him. He didn’t go too far.

He was a successful businessman and well loved in the community. He died of a massive heart attack at age 44. His funeral is one of the first I ever went to. Watching my grandmother and aunt (his wife) deal with his loss was my first real lesson in grief. There was no crazy wailing, although I’m sure  they wanted to rage out. My aunt was fairly stoic. Not cold, just stunned. My grandmother cried, and I remember a cousin telling me that she heard our grandmother say, “I just want you to open up those big blue eyes and say, ‘Mama’ “ as she stood over his coffin.

If there was a family member who didn’t cherish him, I was unaware of it. He was my mother’s brother, and I guess in some families my aunt might have drifted away, but not in ours. She was a fixture at my grandmother’s house for decades – until my grandmother died.

When I got a little older, my aunt would often include me and my cousins in trips to her beach house. (She was not the only generous family member who did things like this, but this is a story for her.) I learned how to fold a fitted sheet on one of those trips. I ate cauliflower for the first time. I had a sundae with both chocolate AND caramel on it. The best kind of memories were made.

At some point, years after my uncle had died, I asked my aunt why she wasn’t dating. She was so fun and such a vital person. She told me that my uncle was the only one for her, and then said, “Do you remember his laugh?” She had such a great smile on her face when she said that, and I kind of knew then that what they had couldn’t be replaced. She might find a substitute, but she was content with her memories of him.

As it turns out, she never married again. I think she has been happy. At least she always seems that way to me. Her two daughters gave her lots of grandchildren, and she has always remained as active as her circumstances would allow.

I thought of her this morning. Of her relationship and the example she set with how she has lived her life. And it came to me that she was in a devoted relationship with my uncle. So many settle for “committed”, when we should really wait for devotion.

What’s the difference? Well, the dictionary says that committed means “to pledge (oneself) to a position on an issue or question; express (one’s intention, feeling, etc.)”.

By contrast, devoted means, “zealous or ardent in attachment, loyalty, or affection.” (Don’t confuse this with obsession… that’s a whole other story.)

But to me, devotion is when your unconscious thought leads you to care for someone. It’s the way a good parent feels about their child. I am truly blessed to be in a devoted romantic relationship, and people ask about it all the time. I’m not sure what they see, but they can tell it’s different. I struggle to put into words how it feels because it always sounds arrogant, and it is not a boastful thing. However, so many people settle for committed, that I wanted to try and put it to words for you.

• Love is preferring one person’s laugh to everyone else in the world.
• Love is fun. It’s like seeing a blockbuster summer film that no one else has seen yet. It’s so amazing and awesome that you want everyone else to experience it, too.
• Love is taking care of their needs before your own – not because you are being nice, but because they are the first thing on your mind.
• Love is 100% reciprocal. (I used to think that one person always loved more than another, but I don’t believe that anymore.)

• Love is not Ross and Rachel from “Friends”. If one partner is acting like Ross, there is no way that relationship will work long term without the other person being truly miserable.
• Love is not work. I’m probably going to irritate a lot of people with that statement, but I owe it to the young people I know to be honest about this. When you are with the right person, it really isn’t work. I know it sounds corny, but you really want the other person to be happy so much that you find the compromises pretty easily and quickly.
• Love does not control you. It won’t tell you who to choose as friends or how to spend your time. (“Honey-do” lists not withstanding.)
• Love builds you up. I can list a million reasons why I love Richard, but the most shocking thing about our relationship is that he can also list a million reasons about me. We both tell each other those things all the time. I joke that I have to harass him a little just so his ego won’t be too big, but I adore him and he knows it.
• Love isn’t jealous. Not just of another person, but of anything. We don’t worry about each other’s loyalty. We both have healthy relationships with friends of the opposite sex. Neither of us are worried about those relationships because we are devoted to each other.

There are lots of other things that love is or it isn’t. If you have a doubt in your mind, then that probably isn’t the real thing. I know that is harsh. I’m sorry for that. I  know a lot of people in committed relationships who have built happy lives for themselves, but it isn’t the same as being devoted. If you still have that choice in front of you, my wish for you is that you hold out for devoted.